High Noon: Democracy in the Middle East

February 18, 2013 | Vince Moore

Middle-East
Middle-East
Middle-East

Since 2010 several Arab nations have successfully overthrown long-lasting dictatorships in the hope that it would lead to democratic forms of governance. But many complications indicate the process might be more agonizing than the initial enthusiasm suggested.

Furman political science professor Kadir Yildirim will look at the current state of the democratic transitions in these Arab countries when he delivers the High Noon lecture Wednesday, Feb. 20 at the Upcountry History Museum/Furman. His talk, “The Arab Spring: Prospects for Democratization,” begins at noon.

In addition to examining the current state of the democratic transitions in these nations, Dr. Yildirim will look at how the new constitutions cater to the supporters of democracy and discuss how Islamists fit into the larger picture.

The winter/spring schedule consists of eight noon lectures on Wednesdays that will run consecutively through March 13. The lectures are free, and people are welcome to bring their lunch to the talks.

The Upcountry History Museum/Furman University is located at 540 Buncombe Street on Heritage Green in downtown Greenville.

For more information, contact Furman’s Marketing and Public Relations office at 864-294-2185 or e-mail Marie Newman-Rogers at marie.newman-rogers@furman.edu.